October 26, 2022 Wilfred Joseph

 

Diners Having Fun at a Restaurant
Two Couples enjoying themselves at a Restaurant

 

Long Island Restaurant Week 2022

 

Well, here’s what you’ve been waiting for, Long Island Restaurant Week 2022 is here.  The fall edition of Long Island Restaurant Week has now been announced.  It will run from November 6 through the 13th..  For eight days, you can get your foodies on and delight in eating at a place you haven’t yet eaten prix-fixe.

“Restaurant Week (Long Island) is a win-win for the diners and restaurants,” said Nicole Castillo of Long Island Restaurant and Hospitality Group, which operates the tri-annual event.  The premise is that diners will enjoy the restaurant at an affordable price and return for special occasions.  The prices range from $27, $37, or $44 for a three-course dinner prix fixe, depending on the restaurant, with many $22 two-course lunch selections when available.

“Restaurant weeks throughout the country have been successful for many years, and Long Island is no different,” Castillo said.  Now you have the chance to try that restaurant that you’ve always wanted.

Here on the North Fork are the participating restaurants:

Legends Restaurant
(637) 734-5123
Prix fixe menus:
New Suffolk New American

One of my favorite restaurants on the North Fork

Anker
(631) 477-0308
Prix fixe menus:
Greenport Seafood

New restaurant with water view on Front Street

The Dimon Estate
(631) 722-0500
Prix fixe menus:
Jamesport New American

Renamed, it used to be the Jamesport Manor Inn.  Well made and presented.

The Preston House & Hotel
(631) 804-6033
Prix fixe menus:
Riverhead American

Offering fine food in Riverhead, try their lunch

La Plage Restaurant
(631) 744-9200
Prix fixe menus:
Wading River Eclectic

Fine French restaurant on the water.  Excellent food

  • Duration: Approximately 1-2 Hours
  • When: November 6-13, 2022
  • Where: On the North Fork
  • Cost: Dinner $27, 37, or 44  3 course prix-fixe; Lunch $22 two-course prix-fixe

 

CHOOSE YOUR ROOM HERE

 



August 4, 2022 Wilfred Joseph

Landcraft Gardens of Mattituck

Landcraft Gardes - Wisteria hanging from pergola
Wisteria hanging from the pergola

Landcraft Gardens of Mattituck

One of the lesser-known facts about the North Fork is that we have a certified bonafide botanical garden accessible to the public.  It is the Landcraft Gardens Foundation In Mattituck.  Located in the heart of Long Island wine country.  These gardens were the brainchild of two visionaries, Dennis Schrader and Bill Smith.  They purchased 17 acres of land in Mattituck and created a nonprofit organization, Landcraft Gardens of Mattituck.

Located in the heart of the North Fork’s wine region on Long Island’s East End, the Landcraft Gardens were established in 1992 by founders Dennis Schrader and Bill Smith.  They purchased 17 acres of land surrounding a circa 1840 farmhouse and donated the entire property to the Landcraft Garden Foundation, a nonprofit591(c)(3)corporation registered with the New York State.

Their vision was to create a garden with unusual and little-known plants while providing an environment for experimenting with exotic plant materials.  They wanted a uniquely American garden of exuberance and different styles of influence seamlessly blending to create a garden of diverse interests.  The garden would exemplify the synthesis of structure, color, distinctive plant material, and composition.

The property is located on a long strip of land.  It is nestled between the Long Island Sound, Mattituck Creek, and the Peconic Bay, which gives the site an unusually long growing season, perfect for the types of plants they want to cultivate.

The more extensive garden comprises several gardens, each with its distinctive border, some blending seamlessly with the natural landscape, some juxtaposing with unusual materials and plants. The garden has benches, low walls, and seats that encourage you to sit awhile while you become one with nature. There are winding walking paths that delight your eye.

 Ownership & Management of Landcraft Gardens of Mattituck

Dennis and Bill will retain a lifetime tenancy of the residence which will pass to the Foundation through their estate.

  • Duration: Approximately 2 Hours, from 10 am -3:30 pm
  • When: Friday & Sundays only, to October 29, 2022
  • Where: Landcraft Gardens (Map)
  • Tickets: $20.00, Student/Senior: $17.00, Children Admission: under 12 years $5.00, under 2 years free, Members: Free

“Delightful conversations over delicious homecooked breakfast and fresh-brewed coffee, tips on off-the-beaten-path restaurants and sights, and a warm and historic “Captain’s” lodging made this too-short seaside vacation an unforgettable one.”

 BOOK YOUR ROOM HERE

 



August 4, 2022 Wilfred Joseph

VIP Blending Session – Wine Making Experience at Sannino Vineyard

Sannino's Vineyard and Winery
Sannino’s Vineyard and Winery

Have a full wine-making immersive experience in the wine-making process hosted by Anthony Sannino, an award-winning winemaker.

Enjoy a VIP blending session of the full wine-making experience process.  You’ll get a full tour of the vineyard wine production facilities and barrel cellar.  All throughout the tour, you will be tasting our current wine lineup to better understand the various methods of making unique styles of wine.  A light lunch is provided after the tour note any food allergies during your reservation).

Then it is the red wine blending session.  Each guest will be able to blend their own wine and take home a bottle (additional bottles may be blended and purchased upon request).

  • Duration: Approximately 3 hours
  • When: Wednesday, August 24, 2022; 3 to 6 pm
  • Where: Sannino Vineyard (Map)
  • Cost:  $175 per person
“Their beds at Arbor View House were comfortable, the ambiance was romantic, and the breakfast was amazing. It was a blend of nouveau style with a Jamaican flare”. 

CHOOSE YOUR ROOM HERE 

 



August 4, 2022 Wilfred Joseph

The Oysterponds Historical Society Summer Benefit

Oysterpond Summer Benefit
People in and out of large tents enjoying the Festivities at the Oysterponds Summer Benefit

Orient is one of North Fork’s most exclusive and historical places. Settlers have been there since the 1640s.  The Oysterpond Historical Society (of which I am a Board member) holds this annual event.

From OHS’s website: “The Oysterponds Historical Society (OHS) was founded in 1944 to preserve the historical significance of Orient and East Marion communities that were still largely populated by direct descendants of the European settlers three centuries before. OHS founding members Mrs. Henry F.J. Knobloch, Mrs. Alma Knox, and Mr. George R. Latham were concerned about the gradual disappearance of Native American artifacts, documents, family records, tools, art, and other surviving evidence of the maritime, agricultural, cultural, and religious life of the early residents of this area.

Today, OHS maintains seven historically-significant buildings located in the heart of Orient, New York’s landmark historic district; cares for 8½ acres of grounds, including Poquatuck Park, a cherished community gathering spot; and actively manages a collection of over 60,000 items, including historical artifacts, documents, diaries, works of art, and archival objects dating from early Native American times all the way through the 20th century. Our archive, which is particularly strong in correspondence and diaries, is a rich and valuable resource regularly used by scholars, writers, genealogists, and students.”

Oysterpond Summer Event

Square Dancing under the tent featuring legendary caller Chart Guthrie and the Dance All Night Band.  Now, even if you’re not inclined to dance, the feel-good, toe-tapping music is a perfect backdrop for a festive celebration of summer!  There’ll be an exciting live auction of a handful of exceptional art pieces, but note that you must purchase a ticket and attend the event to participate.

Wine, beer, specialty cocktails; delicious food from Maple Tree Smokehouse BBQ; homemade sweet tea & lemonade; and bottled water.

Purchase your tickets NOW so that you don’t miss out.

Purchasing a non-member Summer Benefit ticket will automatically enroll you in a 1-year OHS membership!

  • Duration: Approximately 3 hours
  • When: Saturday, August 6, 2022; 6 to 9 pm
  • Where: Poquatuck Park, Orient, NY (Map)
  • Tickets: $150 per person (members); $175 per person (non-members)
“Wilfred and Veda were just so accommodating and friendly.  Veda’s breakfast was delish every morning”.

CHOOSE YOUR ROOM HERE



September 27, 2011 Wilfred Joseph
The Washington Post’s Mensa Invitational once again invited readers to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter, and supply a new definition.  In fact this is an old list that hasbeen circulation around the internet for a few years.  This is the first time I have seen it and thought that some of you might get a good laugh if you have not seen it before, or even if you have. You dont have to have the IQ of a Mensa member.
 
You can find the best explanation of it and the current lists for 2010 and 2011 from Word Play Masters website here.
  
        Here are the winners: (this is the 2009 list)
        
        1. Cashtration (n.): The act of buying a house, which renders the subject financially impotent for an indefinite period of time.
        
        2. Ignoranus: A person who is both stupid and an ass****.
        
        3. Intaxicaton: Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts until you realize it was your money to start with.
        
        4. Reintarnation: Coming back to life as a hillbilly.
        
        5. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.. 
        
        6. Foreploy: Any misrepresentation about yourself for the purpose of getting laid.
        
        7. Giraffiti: Vandalism spray-painted very, very high.
        
        8. Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn’t get it.
        
        9. Inoculatte: To take coffee intravenously when you are running late.
        
        10. Osteopornosis: A degenerate disease. (This one got extra credit.)
        
        11. Karmageddon: It’s like, when everybody is sending off all these really bad vibes, right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it’s like, a serious bummer.
        
        12. Decafalon (n.): The grueling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you.
        
        13. Glibido: All talk and no action. 
        
        14. Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly. 
        
        15. Arachnoleptic Fit (n.): The frantic dance performed just after you’ve accidentally walked through a spider web.
        
        16. Beelzebug (n.): Satan in the form of a mosquito, that gets into your bedroom at three in the morning and cannot be cast out.
        
        17. Caterpallor (n.): The color you turn after finding half a worm in the fruit you’re eating.
        
        The Washington Post has also published the winning submissions to its yearly contest, in which readers are asked to supply alternate meanings for common words.
        
        And the winners are:
        
        1. Coffee (n.) The person upon whom one coughs. 
        
        2. Flabbergasted (adj.) Appalled by discovering how much weight one has gained. 
        
        3. Abdicate (v.) To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach.
        
        4. Esplanade (v.) To attempt an explanation while drunk.
        
        5. Willy-nilly (adj.) Impotent. 
        
        6. Negligent (adj.) Absentmindedly answering the door when wearing only a nightgown.
        
        7. Lymph (v.) To walk with a lisp.
        
        8. Gargoyle (n.) Olive-flavored mouthwash.
        
        9. Flatulence (n.) Emergency vehicle that picks up someone who has been run
over by a steamroller.
        
        10. Balderdash (n.) A rapidly receding hairline.
        
        11. Testicle (n.) A humorous question on an exam. 
        
        12. Rectitude (n.) The formal, dignified bearing adopted by proctologists. 
        
        13. Pokemon (n.) A Rastafarian proctologist.
        
        14. Oyster (n.) A person who sprinkles his conversation with Yiddishisms. 
        
        15. Frisbeetarianism (n.) The belief that, after death, the soul flies up onto the roof and gets stuck there.
         16. Circumvent (n.) An opening in the front of boxer shorts worn by Jewish men. 

 

 



September 13, 2011 Wilfred Joseph

Business travelers and leisure travelers are sometimes as different as cats and dogs, a new study finds.
This article was published in the Washington Post and was written by , Published: September 9
In early August, Travel Leaders arranged a survey on such topical and irksome issues as airport security and baggage fees. The study, based on responses from the group’s 443 travel agents, managers and owners, found that almost 28 percent of business travelers would like to eliminate the TSA’s liquid limit at airports and 28 percent would toss out the shoe removal rule. By contrast, 32 percent of vacationers would jettison pat-downs, followed by the liquid restrictions.
But the groups agreed on ways to avoid checked baggage fees: Travel carry-on only, said 51 percent of business travelers and 61 percent of holiday-goers.
The Fall Travel Trends Survey also ranked the top three domestic destinations for the remainder of 2011: Vegas, Orlando and Hono­lulu. For international spots, the list is Caribbean cruise, Cancun and London. CoGo assumes that these are vacation spots, but kudos to the company that holds stockholder meetings on a cruise ship.